Банкирам не хватит $500K в год чтобы "нормально жить" в NYC

demiurg

Речь о лимите на зарплату который Обама хочет поставить служащим банков, принявших помощь от государства. Смешные рассчёты и траты почти как в тех "советах от жены министра" :)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/08/fashion/08halfmill.html?_r...
You Try to Live on 500K in This Town
PRIVATE school: $32,000 a year per student.
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In Curbing Pay, Obama Seeks to Alter Corporate Culture (February 5, 2009)
Mortgage: $96,000 a year.
Co-op maintenance fee: $96,000 a year.
Nanny: $45,000 a year.
We are already at $269,000, and we haven’t even gotten to taxes yet.
Five hundred thousand dollars — the amount President Obama wants to set as the top pay for banking executives whose firms accept government bailout money — seems like a lot, and it is a lot. To many people in many places, it is a princely sum to live on. But in the neighborhoods of New York City and its suburban enclaves where successful bankers live, half a million a year can go very fast.
“As hard as it is to believe, bankers who are living on the Upper East Side making $2 or $3 million a year have set up a life for themselves in which they are also at zero at the end of the year with credit cards and mortgage bills that are inescapable,” said Holly Peterson, the author of an Upper East Side novel of manners, “The Manny,” and the daughter of Peter G. Peterson, a founder of the equity firm the Blackstone Group. “Five hundred thousand dollars means taking their kids out of private school and selling their home in a fire sale.”
Sure, the solution may seem simple: move to Brooklyn or Hoboken, put the children in public schools and buy a MetroCard. But more than a few of the New York-based financial executives who would have their pay limited are men (and they are almost invariably men) whose identities are entwined with living a certain way in a certain neighborhood west of Third Avenue: a life of private schools, summer houses and charity galas that only a seven-figure income can stretch to cover.
Few are playing sad cellos over the fate of such folk, especially since the collapse of the institutions they run has yielded untold financial pain. But in New York, where a new study from the Center for an Urban Future, a nonprofit research group in Manhattan, estimates it takes $123,322 to enjoy the same middle-class life as someone earning $50,000 in Houston, extricating oneself from steep bills can be difficult.
Therefore, even if it is not for sympathy but for sport, consider the numbers.
The cold hard math can be cruel.
Like those taxes. If a person is married with two children, the weekly deductions on a $500,000 salary are: federal taxes, $2,645; Social Security, $596; Medicare, $139; state taxes, $682; and city, $372, bringing the weekly take-home to $5,180, or about $269,000 a year, said Martin Cohen, a Manhattan accountant.
Now move to living expenses.
Barbara Corcoran, a real estate executive, said that most well-to-do families take at least two vacations a year, a winter trip to the sun and a spring trip to the ski slopes.
Total minimum cost: $16,000.
A modest three-bedroom apartment, she said, which was purchased for $1.5 million, not the top of the market at all, carries a monthly mortgage of about $8,000 and a co-op maintenance fee of $8,000 a month. Total cost: $192,000. A summer house in Southampton that cost $4 million, again not the top of the market, carries annual mortgage payments of $240,000.
Many top executives have cars and drivers. A chauffeur’s pay is between $75,000 and $125,000 a year, the higher end for former police officers who can double as bodyguards, said a limousine driver who spoke anonymously because he does not want to alienate his society customers.
“Some of them want their drivers to have guns,” the driver said. “You get a cop and you have a driver.” To garage that car is about $700 a month.
A personal trainer at $80 an hour three times a week comes to about $12,000 a year.
The work in the gym pays off when one must don a formal gown for a charity gala. “Going to those parties,” said David Patrick Columbia, who is the editor of the New York Social Diary (newyorksocialdiary.com “a woman can spend $10,000 or $15,000 on a dress. If she goes to three or four of those a year, she’s not going to wear the same dress.”
Total cost for three gowns: about $35,000.
Not every bank executive has school-age children, but for those who do, offspring can be expensive. In addition to paying tuition, “You’re not going to get through private school without tutoring a kid,” said Sandy Bass, the editor of Private School Insider, a newsletter that covers private schools in the New York City area. One hour of tutoring once a week is $125. “That’s the low end,” she said. “The higher end is 150, 175.” SAT tutors are about $250 an hour. Total cost for 30 weeks of regular tutoring: $3,750.
Two children in private school: $64,000.
Nanny: $45,000.
Ms. Bass, whose husband is an accountant with many high-end clients, said she spends about $425 every 10 days on groceries for her family. Annual cost: about $15,000.
More? Restaurants. Dry cleaning. Each Brooks Brothers suit costs about $1,000. If you run a bank, you can’t look like a slob.
The total costs here, which do not include a lot of things, like kennels for the dog when the family is away, summer camp, spas and other grooming for the human members of the family, donations to charity, and frozen hot chocolates at Serendipity, are $790,750, which would require about a $1.6-million salary to compensate for taxes. Give or take a few score thousand of dollars.
Does this money buy a chief executive stockholders might prize, a well-to-do man with a certain sureness of stride, something that might be lost if the executive were crowding onto the PATH train every morning at Journal Square, his newspaper splayed against the back of a stranger’s head?
The man would certainly not feel like himself on that train, said Candace Bushnell, the author of “Sex and the City” and other books chronicling New York social mores.
“People inherently understand that if they are going to get ahead in whatever corporate culture they are involved in, they need to take on the appurtenances of what defines that culture,” she said. “So if you are in a culture where spending a lot of money is a sign of success, it’s like the same thing that goes back to high school peer pressure. It’s about fitting in.”
By the way, the frozen hot chocolate costs $8.50.

Ryfargler

если они недоедают, то пусть все что недоедают присылают нам

5tr310k

Co-op maintenance fee: $96,000 a year.
нормально так - 8 штук в месяц. А я-то офигел, когда мне сказали, что в Триумф-Паласе 5 штук в месяц...

vovkak

да уж, меня тоже эта статья поразила.
а в обычных, неэлитных домах в США сколько уходит за обслуживание?

Kraft1

A chauffeur’s pay is between $75,000 and $125,000 a year
мдаааа

raushan27

Nanny: $45,000 a year.

Это тоже нехило.

FieryRush

Вообще странно. Всякие машины, шоферов, нянь и т.п. можно повесить на фирму.

demiurg

Ну ведь няня тоже в Нью-Йорк сити :)

sed777771

Совсем с ума сошли американцы ! Это же коммунизм и уравниловка чистой воды ! Где они нормальных спецов так найдут, да ещё таких что бы не воровали ?
Да некоторые крупные манагеры облажались играя с ФРС в азартные игры, и неплохо бы их наказать, но они уже уволены, да и получили свои премии за плохую работу, да не согласись они на аферы ФРС, они бы проиграли в конкурентной борьбе, конкуренты бы их съели, а акционеры выкинули с работы.
Не бывает эффективных малозарплатных сотрудников, а если бывает, то они быстро переводятся. Жаль что американские налогоплательщики и команда Обамы никогда не видела нынешних российских учителей и врачей. Скоро в США будут такие же автопромышленники и банкиры. Будет значит и в США Перестройка, сваливайте оттудова пока не поздно !

raushan27

По имеющимся у меня данным, няни в мск не сильно дешевле. Тетка приехавшая из этого вашего NYC в мск фаломорфировала увидев цены на нянь здесь. Т.е. ожидала увидеть значительно меньшие цены, а оказалось сравнимо.
4 килобакса за няню в мск - заоблачно. Полагаю, что и там это отнюдь не нижняя цена.

demiurg

Это же коммунизм и уравниловка чистой воды !
Ну можно не брать bailout деньги, и ставить какие хочешь зарплаты :) Если не обанкротишься, конечно.

demiurg

Ну вот в конце 2005 была забастовка MTA, там минимальная зарплата была 50 штук. Вот забастовка была, что им этого типа мало. Это даже не водителей автобусов, а у чуваков которые в будках сидят. Там реально всё дорого, в первую очередь, аренда и покупка недвижимости.

5tr310k

Там реально всё дорого, в первую очередь, аренда и покупка недвижимости.
на Манхэттене да, а в Бруклине, Бронксе и т.д. цены далеко не такие заоблачные

sed777771

Ну можно не брать bailout деньги, и ставить какие хочешь зарплаты Если не обанкротишься, конечно.
А что скажут акционеры ? :crazy:

stas911

But in the neighborhoods of New York City and its suburban enclaves where successful bankers live, half a million a year can go very fast.
Взял деньги - всё, ты больше не successful, хуле.
А вообще, ничего удивительного, кроме того, что обслуживание недвижимости в год стоит ровно столько же, сколько и она сама. Некисло так.

narkom

Жаль что американские налогоплательщики и команда Обамы никогда не видела нынешних российских учителей и врачей.
а ты видел шведских учителей и врачей? :) тут у нас тоже уравниловка. Люди плачут местами, но в принципе работает.

karlash

тоже
Ты правда считаешь нашу систему зарплат уравниловкой?

bitle

Вообще странно. Всякие машины, шоферов, нянь и т.п. можно повесить на фирму.
Наверняка так и есть, но они "как бы сами платят" :grin:

narkom

на счет "вашей" системы не в курсе :) В Швеции уравниловка
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