про африканских мигрантов

gala05

Любопытная статеечка про мигрантов на WSJ
ключевое в статье:
Last year, migrants from sub-Saharan Africa sent $11.2 billion home from Europe, the World Bank estimates. “And that is just a fraction of the overall inflow, as most of the remittances aren’t recorded,” said Dilip Ratha, lead economist with the bank. “Sending back economic migrants will put considerable pressure on the country of origin, because if these people go back, wages can drop by 90%.”
http://www.wsj.com/articles/european-union-seeks-help-from-a...
вся статья
VALLETTA, Malta—The European Union is turning to Africa to stem the flow of what it deems economic migrants who arrive on its shores, but African governments are worried about the consequences of cooperating with the bloc and it is far from clear its plans will work.
At a meeting of more than 60 leaders from Europe and Africa here on Wednesday and Thursday, the EU is expected to announce a special trust fund valued at an initial €1.8 billion ($1.9 billion) to address the economic and other problems they argue prompt people to leave. That would be further supplemented by contributions from EU governments.
In return, African countries are expected to say they will step up the fight against human-trafficking rings, improve record-keeping on their citizens, issue secure passports to make them harder to fake—and, perhaps most controversially—allow for people denied asylum to be sent back to their home countries.
To sweeten the deal, the EU plans to offer a modest increase in legal ways to come to Europe, including more scholarships and short-term visas. But that offer is far less ambitious than what African countries were hoping for, mainly because European countries, under strain from the flow of Syrian, Iraqi and Afghan refugees, have little appetite to open up to other migrants.
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According to international rules, EU nations can’t simply put people who have been rejected asylum on a plane without the right documentation. But so far, the EU has sealed only one readmission deal with an African country, Cape Verde.
In northern Africa, the EU has been negotiating with Morocco since 2003 but has been unable to sign an agreement. Since few sub-Saharan African countries have agreed to take back their citizens, Morocco is reluctant to sign a deal in which the EU expects it to take back people from other nations who crossed through its borders.
The European Commission, the bloc’s executive, aims to open negotiations with Niger and Ethiopia, in the hope that would persuade Morocco to be more open to an agreement.
The biggest African concern is that a clampdown on migrants in former colonizers like France and Italy will stop the flow of money from migrants back home to their families.
Remittances are far and away the biggest and most reliable source of income for Africa’s poor—and in some places, even its middle class, according to the World Bank. In countless villages across West Africa, migrants have a greater role than local governments in funding and planning roads, schools, bridges, solar-panel farms, public water towers and clinics.
Last year, migrants from sub-Saharan Africa sent $11.2 billion home from Europe, the World Bank estimates. “And that is just a fraction of the overall inflow, as most of the remittances aren’t recorded,” said Dilip Ratha, lead economist with the bank. “Sending back economic migrants will put considerable pressure on the country of origin, because if these people go back, wages can drop by 90%.”
Moreover, even if European aid manages to speed up Africa’s development, it isn’t clear this would discourage young people from journeying north. Incomes in Africa have been broadly rising for a decade now. Record numbers have invested in a ticket to Europe.
“They have more access to information, and they’re more connected to the world, and they realize there are more opportunities elsewhere,” said Arezo Malakooti, director of migration research at Altai Consulting, a research group. “The focus is on how to stop the flow, which, it is an impossible task. It just ends up shifting the problem elsewhere.”
Europe is also confronting the complexities of deciding which of Africa’s 54 politically distinct nations are so authoritarian or conflict-stricken that their citizens qualify for asylum.
The continent is home to nations like Togo or Democratic Republic of Congo that are neither total dictatorships nor democracies. Countries facing terrorist groups like Boko Haram—including Cameroon and Niger—can neither say they are at peace nor deeply at war.
“Like the wire fences being erected across Europe, deals to stem migration flows at the expense of human rights will only work in the short term,” said Judith Sunderland from Human Rights Watch.
—Drew Hinshaw and Laurence Norman contributed to this article.

alexshamina

А что про русских в америке пишут? Или только поют

gala05

в финансовой новостной ленте - про то, насколько ослабла экономика России. Сегодня писали, что в октябре продано машин меньше на 30%, чем в 2014 году
и так уже полтора года пишут
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